Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Floor Plans of the Lower Dacha in Peterhof

Nicholas II’s Lower Dacha in Peterhof has been shrouded in mystery for decades. There have been brief references yet confusion arose over its different names; Private Dacha, Nicholas’ Dacha, Nicholas’ Palace, Lower Palace, Lower Dacha.

In the 1920s-30s, a rare small guidebook was published in English describing the main rooms for tourists visiting Petrodvorets.  Old photos have been released in the last years but the floor plans remained elusive.

Last year I discovered Peterhof Museum’s proposal for the reconstruction and rebuilding of the Lower Dacha. Scrolling down the pdf, I had a moment of disbelief seeing the floor plans!

Large copies of plans and floor plans (below)



















3 comments:

  1. i believe those are the proposed plans for it's reconstruction and are not exactly the same as what was originally built. a couple of years ago, i came across an old russian architectural journal that had the plans of the dacha. later, on the same day, i also found the plans for all the floors of the Vladimir Palace and Mariinsky Palace (sp?) in a different set of journals.
    i was absolutely floored!!! it was wonderful.

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    1. I love those moments of Eureka! What a lucky find!

      What is the date of the Lower Dacha plans in the journal? We know the dacha had additions c1896 but later with more children, other renovations and additions were probably completed.

      Are the floor plans of the Mariinsky Palace prior to 1885 when it became the State Council?

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  2. the Lower Dacha plans seem to be dated 1904, however i have to admit the handwrting is almost illegible....but it does appear to be 1904.

    and as for the Mariinsky, the plans are for when it was still a private residence & shows the basement and all 3 above-ground floors and the chapel above the central pediment over the entrance. i also have a post 1885 plan that i found online which shows the main state council meeting hall, which required the destruction of the Winter Garden.

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